sujay:

Wired: Your Life Torn Open
Genius. Wired UK sends readers a personalized copy of their new privacy-focused issue, with personal details about the reader found around the web.


 
The internet has become a global record of our streams of consciousness. Is anything private?
 
Reminds of this article posted on CNN a while ago which listed publicly available information about the tech blogger Louis Gray


Like some tech early-adopters these days, Gray thinks privacy is a dying concept.
Among the personal nuggets a quick search reveals:
• Gray has three children: 2-and-a-half-year-old twins named Matthew and Sarah; and Braden, who is three months old and was born prematurely. The twins dressed up as Peter Pan and Tinker Bell, respectively, for Halloween this year — and when they hear techno music, they jitter around like they’re on nonexistent trampolines.
• Kristine Gray, Louis’ history-loving, school-teaching wife, makes some interesting — and potentially embarrassing — purchases on their family credit card. Among them: $109.25 per month to rent a breast milk pump from El Camino Hospital Maternal Connections. The last time she made such a purchase was November 29.
• Louis Gray — who espouses Democratic politics and Mormon religious beliefs — blogs about tech and has worked at an app company called my6sense since August. He spent $321.81 on groceries last month at Safeway. Also during November, he rented dozens of movies and TV shows from Netflix, including “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure” and “Dexter,” a Showtime series about a serial killer. He goes to the dentist at Great Smiles Care Dental in Cupertino, California. He’s been there once in the past two months.
• His phone of choice is the Samsung Epic 4G. Give him a ring. His number, as his public Facebook page blabs, is 408-646-2759.

sujay:

Wired: Your Life Torn Open

Genius. Wired UK sends readers a personalized copy of their new privacy-focused issue, with personal details about the reader found around the web.

The internet has become a global record of our streams of consciousness. Is anything private?

 

Reminds of this article posted on CNN a while ago which listed publicly available information about the tech blogger Louis Gray

Like some tech early-adopters these days, Gray thinks privacy is a dying concept.

Among the personal nuggets a quick search reveals:

• Gray has three children: 2-and-a-half-year-old twins named Matthew and Sarah; and Braden, who is three months old and was born prematurely. The twins dressed up as Peter Pan and Tinker Bell, respectively, for Halloween this year — and when they hear techno music, they jitter around like they’re on nonexistent trampolines.

• Kristine Gray, Louis’ history-loving, school-teaching wife, makes some interesting — and potentially embarrassing — purchases on their family credit card. Among them: $109.25 per month to rent a breast milk pump from El Camino Hospital Maternal Connections. The last time she made such a purchase was November 29.

• Louis Gray — who espouses Democratic politics and Mormon religious beliefs — blogs about tech and has worked at an app company called my6sense since August. He spent $321.81 on groceries last month at Safeway. Also during November, he rented dozens of movies and TV shows from Netflix, including “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure” and “Dexter,” a Showtime series about a serial killer. He goes to the dentist at Great Smiles Care Dental in Cupertino, California. He’s been there once in the past two months.

• His phone of choice is the Samsung Epic 4G. Give him a ring. His number, as his public Facebook page blabs, is 408-646-2759.

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Geek Power: Steven Levy Revisits Tech Titans, Hackers, Idealists

“It’s funny in a way”, says Bill Gates, relaxing in an armchair in his office. “When I was young, I didn’t know any old people. When we did the microprocessor revolution, there was nobody old, nobody. It’s weird how old this industry has become.” The Microsoft cofounder and I, a couple of fiftysomething codgers, are following up on an interview I had with a tousle-headed Gates more than a quarter century ago. I was trying to capture what I thought was the red-hot core of the then-burgeoning computer revolution — the scarily obsessive, absurdly brainy, and endlessly inventive people known as hackers. Back then, Gates had just pulled off a deal to supply his DOS operating system to IBM. His name was not yet a household word; even Word was not yet a household word. I would interview Gates many times over the years, but that first conversation was special. I saw his passion for computers as a matter of historic import. Gates himself saw my reverence as an intriguing novelty. But by then I was convinced that I was documenting a movement that would affect everybody.

(Read More)

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Geek Power: Steven Levy Revisits Tech Titans, Hackers, Idealists

“It’s funny in a way”, says Bill Gates, relaxing in an armchair in his office. “When I was young, I didn’t know any old people. When we did the microprocessor revolution, there was nobody old, nobody. It’s weird how old this industry has become.” The Microsoft cofounder and I, a couple of fiftysomething codgers, are following up on an interview I had with a tousle-headed Gates more than a quarter century ago. I was trying to capture what I thought was the red-hot core of the then-burgeoning computer revolution — the scarily obsessive, absurdly brainy, and endlessly inventive people known as hackers. Back then, Gates had just pulled off a deal to supply his DOS operating system to IBM. His name was not yet a household word; even Word was not yet a household word. I would interview Gates many times over the years, but that first conversation was special. I saw his passion for computers as a matter of historic import. Gates himself saw my reverence as an intriguing novelty. But by then I was convinced that I was documenting a movement that would affect everybody.

(Read More)

Comments

Geek Power: Steven Levy Revisits Tech Titans, Hackers, Idealists

“It’s funny in a way”, says Bill Gates, relaxing in an armchair in his office. “When I was young, I didn’t know any old people. When we did the microprocessor revolution, there was nobody old, nobody. It’s weird how old this industry has become.” The Microsoft cofounder and I, a couple of fiftysomething codgers, are following up on an interview I had with a tousle-headed Gates more than a quarter century ago. I was trying to capture what I thought was the red-hot core of the then-burgeoning computer revolution — the scarily obsessive, absurdly brainy, and endlessly inventive people known as hackers. Back then, Gates had just pulled off a deal to supply his DOS operating system to IBM. His name was not yet a household word; even Word was not yet a household word. I would interview Gates many times over the years, but that first conversation was special. I saw his passion for computers as a matter of historic import. Gates himself saw my reverence as an intriguing novelty. But by then I was convinced that I was documenting a movement that would affect everybody.

(Read More)

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SMS helps fight #Malaria

Can texting help reverse Africa’s malaria epidemic? The answer seems to be a resounding “Yes.”

Using a mix of text messages, Google Maps and cloud software, organizers of a pilot program backed by IBM, Novartis and Vodafone believe they saved hundreds of lives in a few short months on the malaria-wracked African continent. Simply by tracking inventory in remote areas with greater efficiency, the anti-malaria groups were able to increase the chances that any given clinic would have life-saving medicine on hand by 300 percent.


Read More http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/04/sms-fights-malaria-scourge-in-africa/#ixzz0m0XPjnf1
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