The results reveal some fascinating patterns in city structure. For a start, every city undergoes a kind of respiration in which people converge into the center and then withdraw on a daily basis, almost like breathing. And this happens in all cities.

This “suggests the existence of a single ‘urban rhythm’ common to all cities,” says Louail and co.

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Oh captain. My captain.

The new ad for iPad Air uses a quote from Dead Poet’s Society. 

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race.

And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life.

But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

To quote from Whitman, “O me! O life!… of the questions of these recurring; of the endless trains of the faithless… of cities filled with the foolish; what good amid these, O me, O life?” Answer.

That you are here - that life exists, and identity; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse. That the powerful play *goes on* and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?

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The biggest tennis court in the world.
This was a fun start to the day. ASB invited a few people out this morning to what promised to be a 1000 KM long Tennis Match at the Auckland Tennis Centre.
ASB Bank have attempted to make “The biggest tennis court in the world” using some cool technology built by Rush Digital.
Half a tennis court in Auckland, the other half in Christchurch - which is a 1000 KMs away.
Players take aim at a giant screen, the ball is tracked is by high speed cameras, the trajectory calculated and then a ball shot out through a machine. 
Surprisingly little lag allows players to rally almost in real time.
Here’s a video showing the technology in action:

The biggest tennis court in the world.

This was a fun start to the day. ASB invited a few people out this morning to what promised to be a 1000 KM long Tennis Match at the Auckland Tennis Centre.

ASB Bank have attempted to make “The biggest tennis court in the world” using some cool technology built by Rush Digital.

Half a tennis court in Auckland, the other half in Christchurch - which is a 1000 KMs away.

Players take aim at a giant screen, the ball is tracked is by high speed cameras, the trajectory calculated and then a ball shot out through a machine.

Surprisingly little lag allows players to rally almost in real time.

Here’s a video showing the technology in action:

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The kind of technology guidance that consumers need today differs markedly from what they needed in 2006.

The hard technology choices of that time have been rendered fundamentally uninteresting by basic technological progress: cheap, good HDTVs abound, an MP3 player is simply an app, and few would even consider owning a digital camera other than the one on their smartphone.

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I’m Not Saying: the website is broken therefore the company must have stupid web people.

I Am Saying: the website is broken therefore the company must have stupid leadership.

I Am Further Saying: I bet the web people are brilliant and are struggling to cope with an organisation that thinks the web is for marketing and aftersales rather then realising that the web is the platform on which they should build their whole business.

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…The economic reality is that most apps offer next to no value to people. They might say otherwise when asked about, but their actions speak pretty clearly: A cup of coffee is worth more than almost every app on the store.

That’s a hard pill to swallow, but we should let it sink in.

We pour all our creativity, time, and passion into creating basically worthless products.

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In advertising, the best way to sell in a concept has always been to show it. Create a storyboard. Do a sketch.

But today, some of the biggest ideas are digital, and to effectively convey them, traditional prototyping tools fall short.

So creatives have had to get a lot more, well, creative.

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…beautiful visual design is only part of the battle.

What’s more interesting, from a design solution standpoint, is the design thinking and making that subsequently happened.

And that design thinking includes the constraints, requirements, hurdles, and other barriers to design. The making includes the actual building of the product…was it actually built and did people actually adopt it?

It’s one thing to imagine a beautiful interface in Photoshop: it’s another to build it and get people to use it.

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Tell your design story

I think the future of sharing design work will be more about story and less about visuals.

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Addicted to Apps
If engineers can build something, the thinking goes, they do. Whether they should is beside the point. People will eventually adapt, engineers believe, just as they always have.
But we cannot rely on the makers of new technology to think about the moral and privacy implications, she said. “There is not a lot of internal searching among engineers,” she said. 
“They are not encouraged to say, ‘What does that mean for society?’That job is left for others. And the law and social norms trail in dealing with the pace of technical changes right now.”

Addicted to Apps

If engineers can build something, the thinking goes, they do. Whether they should is beside the point. People will eventually adapt, engineers believe, just as they always have.

But we cannot rely on the makers of new technology to think about the moral and privacy implications, she said. “There is not a lot of internal searching among engineers,” she said.

“They are not encouraged to say, ‘What does that mean for society?’That job is left for others. And the law and social norms trail in dealing with the pace of technical changes right now.”

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Is this what we want? Fully informed people, staring blankly at the real world as their virtual minders tell them what is happening?

We are entering unknown territory, and much of what is being done is simply because it can be done.

In the end, wearable technologies will either be able to augment our experiences, and focus our attention on the task and the people with whom we are interacting, or they’ll distract us—diverting our attention through tasty morsels of information irrelevant to the current activity.

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But the same technological advances that have empowered the rise of Big Brother have created another wrinkle in the story.

We might call it the emergence of Little Brother: the ordinary citizen who by chance finds himself in a position to record events of great public import, and to share the results with the rest of us.

This has become immeasurably easier and more likely with the near-ubiquitous proliferation of high-quality recording devices.

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