Posts tagged music

Rappers, sorted by the size of their vocabulary.

35,000 words covers 3-5 studio albums and EPs. I included mixtapes if the artist was just short of the 35,000 words. Quite a few rappers don’t have enough official material to be included (e.g., Biggie, Kendrick Lamar). As a benchmark, I included data points for Shakespeare and Herman Melville, using the same approach (35,000 words across several plays for Shakespeare, first 35,000 of Moby Dick).

I used a research methodology called token analysis to determine each artist’s vocabulary. Each word is counted once, so pimpspimppimping, and pimpinare four unique words. To avoid issues with apostrophes (e.g., pimpin’ vs. pimpin), they’re removed from the dataset. It still isn’t perfect. Hip hop is full of slang that is hard to transcribe (e.g., shorty vs. shawty), compound words (e.g., king shit), featured vocalists, and repetitive choruses.

The Wyld @ Roxy 

This felt like a landmark gig for the band - the first since the launch of their EP Abstract that was released in October this year.

Unfortunately, weighing up the sum of all parts, it was a let down. This is a band that is clearly talented - but oh so painfully aware of themselves, and the crowd when live. It was awkward.

There were traces of Shabazz Palaces in there along with Morelloesque guitar riffs but all up it felt really amateurish - look ma, I rap with guitars. The tinny sound setup was partly to blame, Mo really did shine through in those short a capella bursts.

Will still recommend you give this a spin: Abstract EP.

Hi you look nice today. 

Did you know Broken Bells have a new song?

..between thought and expression, lies a lifetime.

Rest in peace Lou.

If you’ve never experienced a discussion of metal’s sub-generic classifications, you might be surprised to learn how fragmented these sub-genres can be, which in turn can lead to wildly over-thought classification schemes (e.g., I recently argued with a friend for an hour about whether Poland’s Decapitated is “ultra-technical death metal” or simply “modern math metal”).

What’s more likely the case is that you just don’t care, which is precisely the point.

Subcultures of alienation thrive on being alien, at least in comparison with the larger population (even if they demonstrate a remarkable uniformity within their own tribe [think black concert T-shirts and long hair on men]).

At the center of all this tribalism is freedom from convention (well, those not imposed by the tribe, at least) and a constant opportunity for cathartic expression.

And these are the very roots of creativity.

O.K., and now to explain how it’s done. Well, it’s a little like trying to hit a bottle cap with a wire coat hanger.

Every day a songwriter rows out into the deep waters in search of his own personal Loch Ness monster. (Just a matter of time, we insist.)

Being a weary subscriber to the old inspiration-perspiration theory, I must say that minus the former, you’ll hit a sweaty dead end every time, yet without this purging of what I call “brain vomit,” you’ll never drain the 99 pieces of hooey before one of pure inspiration writes itself for you.

Paul Westerberg on incorrect grammar, song writing and digesting books.

Simple or Impossible - NYTimes.com

OK Computer - Visualized

It’s early on Saturday morning and I didn’t have much to do so I made a wordcloud from the lyrics of all the songs in Radiohead's 1997 classic OK Computer

Wordle is a free to use site that lets you create wordclouds from any text. It’s fun to visualize!

This weeks music hauls #NowPlaying

Stone Temple Pilots - Stone Temple Pilots

Band of Horses - Infinite Arms

Male Bonding - Nothing Hurts

  The National - High Violet

This weeks music hauls #NowPlaying

Stone Temple Pilots - Stone Temple Pilots

Band of Horses - Infinite Arms

Male Bonding - Nothing Hurts

  The National - High Violet

The National Agenda

IN THE DEAD of late January, the five members of the band the National were sprawled around a music studio in the attic of a weathered, gray Bridgeport, Conn., mansion. The studio belongs to the National’s producer, Peter Katis, and after many long months of recording and rerecording their fifth album in Brooklyn, where the band members all now live, they had come to Connecticut for an efficient few weeks of mixing. Things were not turning out that way. The National is composed of the identical-twin guitar-playing brothers Bryce and Aaron Dessner; a second pair of brothers, Bryan Devendorf, the drummer, and Scott Devendorf, who usually plays bass; and Matt Berninger, the band’s vocalist. Matt also writes the lyrics. He is tall, with a sturdy jib, cool blue eyes, a three-day reddish blond beard and enough lead-singer swagger to hold his own among all those siblings.

Read More

The National Agenda

IN THE DEAD of late January, the five members of the band the National were sprawled around a music studio in the attic of a weathered, gray Bridgeport, Conn., mansion. The studio belongs to the National’s producer, Peter Katis, and after many long months of recording and rerecording their fifth album in Brooklyn, where the band members all now live, they had come to Connecticut for an efficient few weeks of mixing. Things were not turning out that way. The National is composed of the identical-twin guitar-playing brothers Bryce and Aaron Dessner; a second pair of brothers, Bryan Devendorf, the drummer, and Scott Devendorf, who usually plays bass; and Matt Berninger, the band’s vocalist. Matt also writes the lyrics. He is tall, with a sturdy jib, cool blue eyes, a three-day reddish blond beard and enough lead-singer swagger to hold his own among all those siblings.

Read More

Untitled

…state of mind?

#np

Untitled

…state of mind?

#np

Next page Something went wrong, try loading again? Loading more posts