Posts tagged microsoft

Almost no one noticed, however, even though Microsoft’s policy changes are much the same as those that Google made to its privacy rules this year.

Google’s expanded powers drew scathing criticism from privacy advocates, probing inquiries from regulators and broadside attacks from rivals. Those included Microsoft, which bought full-page newspaper ads telling Google users that Google did not care about their privacy, an accusation it quickly denied.

The difference in the two events illustrates the confusion surrounding Internet consumer privacy. No single authority oversees the collection of personal information from Web users by Internet companies. Though most companies have written privacy policies, they are often stated in such broad, ambiguous language that they seem to allow virtually any use of customers’ personal information.

Girl busy txting falls into fountain

This does not surprise me.

What does surprise me is that she was looking at the screen while txting. 

People now have become such adept multi-taskers. I have had so many conversations with people, while their fingers were in the midst of another one - on the phone. 

Advertising is supposed to imitate life right? Well, since the video of the girl surfaced, the makers of this ad for Microsoft must be feeling smug and content. 

Time for Microsoft to send her a phone.


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Ballmer previews Microsoft’s next Messenger

The new version of Windows Live Messenger, being tested within Microsoft right now, allows for tabbed browsing, deeper integration with social networks, and sharing of more content types, such as Web pages and search results.

(Credit: Microsoft)

Untitled

Ballmer previews Microsoft’s next Messenger

The new version of Windows Live Messenger, being tested within Microsoft right now, allows for tabbed browsing, deeper integration with social networks, and sharing of more content types, such as Web pages and search results.

(Credit: Microsoft)

Geek Power: Steven Levy Revisits Tech Titans, Hackers, Idealists

“It’s funny in a way”, says Bill Gates, relaxing in an armchair in his office. “When I was young, I didn’t know any old people. When we did the microprocessor revolution, there was nobody old, nobody. It’s weird how old this industry has become.” The Microsoft cofounder and I, a couple of fiftysomething codgers, are following up on an interview I had with a tousle-headed Gates more than a quarter century ago. I was trying to capture what I thought was the red-hot core of the then-burgeoning computer revolution — the scarily obsessive, absurdly brainy, and endlessly inventive people known as hackers. Back then, Gates had just pulled off a deal to supply his DOS operating system to IBM. His name was not yet a household word; even Word was not yet a household word. I would interview Gates many times over the years, but that first conversation was special. I saw his passion for computers as a matter of historic import. Gates himself saw my reverence as an intriguing novelty. But by then I was convinced that I was documenting a movement that would affect everybody.

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